Whimbrels

Whimbrel Whimbrels, with their striking downcurved bills, can be sp0tted on most of the muddy flats that emerge around the estuary as the tide recedes. They often stroll with their heads slightly forward and their necks angled, giving them the appearance of an urbanite late for an appointment. Like most long-billed shorebirds, whimbrels probe in sand and mud for crabs, mollusks. and worms. Their call sounds something like pi-pi-pi. Whimbrels migrate from breeding grounds in the far north to wintering grounds as far south as South America. In the wild, Whimbrels have been known to live for at least 14 years (one was captured, banded, and recaptured 14 years later). • Some migrating Whimbrels make a nonstop over8 Marbled Godwit Another long-billed bird that seems happiest when probing in the mud for seafood, the Godwit has a slightly upturned beak. They can be seen in small numbers mixing with Willets, Whimbrels, and (as in the photograph below) Ruddy Turnstones.

Whimbrel
Whimbrels, with their striking downcurved
bills, can be sp0tted on most
of the muddy flats that emerge
around the estuary as the tide
recedes. They often stroll with
their heads slightly forward
and their necks angled, giving
them the appearance of an urbanite
late for an appointment.
Like most long-billed shorebirds,
whimbrels probe in sand and mud for
crabs, mollusks. and worms.
Their call sounds something
like pi-pi-pi.
Whimbrels migrate from
breeding grounds in the far
north to wintering grounds
as far south as South America.
In the wild, Whimbrels have been
known to live for at least 14 years (one
was captured, banded, and recaptured 14 years
later).
• Some migrating Whimbrels make a nonstop over8
Marbled Godwit
Another long-billed bird that seems
happiest when probing in the mud
for seafood, the Godwit has a slightly
upturned beak.
They can be seen in small numbers
mixing with Willets, Whimbrels, and
(as in the photograph below) Ruddy
Turnstones.