Black-necked Stilt

Black-necked Stilt The gorgeous Black-necked Stilt, whose name needs no explanation, can sometimes be seen along the mudflats that line the approach channels to the marina. Occasionally, it can be seen on the sidewalks and docks in the marina itself. Black-necked stilts typically nest inland throughout most of their range (which includes California, where they are locally abundant). They build nests on the ground. They usually nest in small colonies, but with nests spaced about 65 feet (20 meters) apart. The young have been seen swimming within two days of hatching, but they return to the nest for several days and depend on their parents for weeks even after the nest has been entirely abandoned (something like many human young adults).

Black-necked Stilt
The gorgeous Black-necked Stilt, whose name needs no explanation,
can sometimes be seen along the mudflats that line
the approach channels to the marina. Occasionally, it can
be seen on the sidewalks and docks in the marina itself.
Black-necked stilts typically nest inland throughout
most of their range (which includes California, where
they are locally abundant). They build nests on the
ground. They usually nest in small colonies, but with
nests spaced about 65 feet (20 meters) apart. The young
have been seen swimming within two days of hatching,
but they return to the nest for several days and depend on
their parents for weeks even after the nest has been entirely
abandoned (something like many human young adults).