Yellow-crowned Night Heron

Yellow-crowned Night Heron Both Black-crowned and Yellow-crowned Night Herons perch low in trees near the water or hunt along the beaches, but the Yellow-crowned Night heron is far more common, probably because the Black-crowned Night Heron, as a rule, avoids the pesky presence of humans (including photographers). Their loud “wock” or “squawk” call, almost a bark, is often heard late into the night. For unknown reasons (it happens), Yellowcrowned Night Herons spread northward from about 1925 until 1960, and what was once thought of as a southern bird is now found as far north as the Canadian border. Both juveniles and adults are common in the Marina Chiapas estuary. The juveniles, at right, look somewhat like skinny Bitterns, and will not take on the distinctive good looks of their parents (at left) until they are two years old.

Yellow-crowned Night
Heron
Both Black-crowned and Yellow-crowned Night Herons
perch low in trees near the water or hunt along the
beaches, but the Yellow-crowned
Night heron is far more common,
probably because the Black-crowned
Night Heron, as a rule, avoids the
pesky presence of humans (including
photographers).
Their loud “wock” or “squawk” call,
almost a bark, is often heard late into
the night.
For unknown reasons (it happens), Yellowcrowned
Night Herons spread northward
from about 1925 until 1960, and what was
once thought of as a southern bird is now
found as far north as the Canadian border.
Both juveniles and adults are common in
the Marina Chiapas estuary. The juveniles,
at right, look somewhat like skinny Bitterns,
and will not take on the distinctive good looks of
their parents (at left) until they are two years old.