CHECK THE CARIBBEAN ROUTE
PANAMA CANAL – FLORIDA

There are over 400+ anchorages  and 15+marinas along the Western Caribbean Basin  Coast. And this season we will collect and verify the Caribbean route.
 

 

This route is designed to for vessels heading from Panama or Colombia towards the US with interim stops in Jamaica, Cayman Islands, Roatan Honduras, a possible seasonal layover in the hurricane hole of Rio Dulce in Guatemala. Continuing on Northbound via the second largest reef in world off the coat of Belize, hugging the Yucatan Peninsula, Isla Mujeres Mexico and Cancun. With an optional stop over in Cuba ending up in the Florida Keys.

The Caribbean route from Panama northbound has some distinct weather challenges -and on the Western Route Security challenges – but several vessels in the past have successfully navigated these waters and made safe passages. Vessel soften split up the season by summering over in Rio Dulce as long as their draft is 6 foot or less.

The Panama Posse Route for Cruising Central America

🇵🇦 PANAMA - Caribbean
🇪🇨 COLOMBIA - Caribbean
🇯🇲 JAMAICA
🇰🇾 CAYMAN ISLANDS
🇭🇳 HONDURAS - Roatan
🇬🇹 GUATEMALA - Rio Dulce
🇧🇿 BELIZE
🇲🇽 MEXICO - Caribbean
🇨🇺 CUBA
🇺🇸 USA - Florida

PANAMA CANAL – COLOMBIAN BORDER – 180nm

50+ anchorages 4 marinas and the precocious San Blas Islands archipelago  comprising approximately 365 islands and cays, of which 49 are inhabited. This  autonomous region government bu the Kuna Indians – it’s a leisurely 180 nm to the border

COLOMBIA NORTH COAST- 280nm

- gunkhole against prevailing winds stay close to shore

OFFSHORE PASSAGE FROM COLOMBIA TO JAMAICA - 430 nm

JAMAICA

CAYMAN ISLANDS

GUATEMALA - RIO DULCE

HURRICANE HOLE for vessels with < 6 foot draft

BELIZE

MEXICO - CARIBBEAN

CUBA

KEY WEST

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CARIBBEAN PILOT CHARTS

Pilot Charts depict averages in prevailing winds and currents, air and sea temperatures, wave heights, visibility, barometric pressure, and weather conditions at different times of the year. The information used to compile these averages was obtained from oceanographic and meteorologic observations over many decades during the late 18th and 19th centuries.

The charts are intended to aid the navigator in selecting the fastest and safest routes with regards to the expected weather and ocean conditions. The charts are not intended to be used for navigation.