Panama Posse

 

 

 

 “Difficulties are just things to overcome, after all.” 
 

 ― Ernest Shackleton 
 

Panama Posse in Panama

ENJOY
· DAD’S DREAM ·  GLADAN  ·  ROCINANTE · REACH ·
 SPILL THE WINE ·  SECOND SET  ·   AGAPE   ·
 FOOTLOOSE  · EDDIE FROM SHELTER BAY MARINA

 

 

Nov 7, 2021  
PANAMA POSSE FLEET UPDATE 

 

  

 

Fleet

 

To submit your missing headshots of captain admiral crew and please email us >>

Meet the fleet

 

 2) INTRODUCING MARINA PUERTO BAHIA  🇩🇴  Dominican Republic  the latest marina sponsor of the Panama Posse 

 

Marina Puerto Bahia

 

Puerto
Bahía is a full service marina in Samaná, Northeast of Dominican
Republic, offering slips for vessels up to 150ft LOA and access to
boutique hotel amenities.

We are pleased to sponsor the Panama Posse with a special rate of $ 1.00 per foot per night, and welcome you with a “Presidente fría”! 

Gavi Roustand

Harbour Master

C: +1 809 801 9756

E: marina@puertobahiasamana.com

 

Gavi

 

 

Location

 

Location and sunset
Marina Puerto Bahia

 

 

3) PANAMA POSSE  “PORT SAFETY” courtesy of Safe Esteem

  • If you rent a car be certain to remove the Rental Car frame around
    the license plate to avoid corrupt local officials from stopping you
    over others and thieves which look for rental cars to break into.

     
  • Park close to the entrance of the supermarket where there is a lot of foot traffic.
     
  • LOCK YOUR CAR  and if you can keep an eye on your car.
     
  • With taxis always pre-negotiate the total fee in the local currency. Use Uber/Lyft if available.
     
  • Ask for the drivers name and text the license plate to yourself or your buddy boat.
     
  • Carry ID (copy of passport) with you at all times.
     
  • If you get stopped by  traffic police ask for the ticket !
     
  • Do not pay a bribe. YOU are training them !
     
  • Corrupt cops will do everything possible to delay you in order to get their bribe – so tell them you are not in a hurry and
    plan on staying months in the area with a local gringo. DO not tell
    them that you are trying to catch a flight or late for it – stay calm
    and act with no worry and no hurry. 

     
  • Simply keep asking for the ticket – do not pay anything on the spot.
     
  • If they ask for your passport let them know that it is with the Marina Office and that you request their official ID for verification and to please call the Marina office. Show them your photocopy.
     
  • Always Write down the official’s name,
    station, telephone number and address of the station and location –
    (have the official write it down for you so you have proof)

     
  • If you are on the road or walking in a busy area and you think / feel, you are being followed make 3 left turns – if the car or person is still behind you – you are not paranoid- you are being followed !
     
  • Make your way as quickly as possible to a 4 or 5 star resort
    think Marriott, Sheraton, Hilton and got to the front desk and ask to
    speak with the chief security officer and inform them of you being
    followed.

     
  • Do not visit the capitals, presidential palaces or universities – especially  when there are protests planned.
     
  • When
    going through locations with security (e.g. transportation, large
    events), it is safest to move through security versus remaining outside a
    venue or remain in public areas. 

     
  • Where possible, use public transportation at off-peak times and be efficient; do not linger in terminals or boarding areas longer than necessary. 
     
  • If someone tell you that you have some stain or liquid on your shirt turn away from them immediately  – they are pick pocketing you  – go towards a wall and face outward fending of anyone coming near you.
 

https://www.safe-esteem.com/

 

 

 

4) CHECK OUT WESTERN PANAMA PACIFIC andCHECK IN REPORT SOUTHERN COSTA RICA 

AHOY PANAMA POSSE 

 

We
have finally arrived in Costa Rica and thought we would send you a
quick summary on the check out and check in process over the past two
weeks. If there are any boats coming through the counter posse this
information might be helpful.

 

Puerto
Armuelles -we emailed the Port Captain prior to our arrival, and he
requested all our paperwork electronically before we arrived.  
Once we arrived, the check out was quick and painless, except for a
difficult dinghy landing, Reinaldo was fantastic and very helpful. Not
only did he ensure we had some additional help on the beach, but he also
walked us through to immigration, merchant marine and finally completed
all our paperwork.  After everything was completed, he handed us a
little gift bag and assisted us off the beach. Exceptional service from
the Port.

 

 

Here is his contact information:

 

Reinaldo Omar Barrantes

 

Email: robarrantes@amp.gob.pa

 

Telephone: (507) 770-7741

 

 

 

Golfito
– we had spoken with Banana Bay prior to arrival and thought we would
be able to check in ourselves with things relaxing a bit with COVID
however a marina or agent is still required for the process. Banana Bay
charged us $350 US Dollars for the process/fees and it did take the
majority of the day to check-in.  As well, the boat was inspected
by the Department of Agriculture looking specifically for any raw pork
products and live animals. We provided the dinghy ride for the inspector
back and forth to the boat as we were anchored off the marina. They
have also decreased the time limit for pleasure vessels in Costa Rica
back to 90 days and the 180 day option is no longer available from the
Aduana, for those seeking more time in the country.

 

 

 

Gabriela
from Banana Bay was awesome running us around to the different offices
and the other quote we received from an agent was $800.00 US so Banana
Bay is a great option especially if you an anchored off the marina.

 

 

Puerto Armuelles

Puerto Armuelles in Good Nautical 

Costa Rica Banana Bay Marina

Golfito in Good Nautical 

Report from 
GARGOYLE

Kevin & Carla
https://www.svgargoyle.com/

 

 

 

 

5) 🇵🇦 CASCO VIEJO, PANAMA

Casco Viejo

The quaint and historic streets in Casco Viejo

 

Casco
Viejo (Old Quarter), also known as Casco Antiguo or San Felipe, is the
historic district of Panama City. Completed and settled in 1673, it was
built following the near-total destruction of the original Panamá city
by Governor Juan Perez de Guzman who had it set on fire, before the
attack and looting by the pirate and fellow seafarer Henry Morgan.

Casco Viejo

American Trade Hotel

American Hotel

The champagne of coffees

There’s
coffee and then there’s Geisha coffee, Panama’s prized brew that’s one
of the world’s best – and most expensive – cups of joe. Originally
brought over from Ethiopia, local growers found that Geisha coffee beans
thrived in Panama’s climate.  In Casco, sip the champagne of
coffees at Café Unido located within The American Trade Hotel at Plaza
Herrera.

Another happy customer at Tio Navaja Restaurant

Tio Navajo

The view of the water front from the surrounding brid

Old Map of Casco Viejo
Casco Viejo

 

6) DELTA SWIZZLER’S UNINVITED VISITOR 

Before
I forget. I need to post this for Most Unwanted Visitor in board. Open
our door to go down the stairs. Darn near stepped on this Boa. 😆

MARK & CINDY 

 

 

 

7) PANAMA POSSE CREW FOR YOUR BOAT 

VESSEL LOOKIGN FOR CREW >>>
please notify the Panama Posse via email 
 

CREW – LOOKING FOR A VESSEL

 https://panamaposse.com/crew-looking-for-a-vessel

 

 

https://panamaposse.com/crew

 

8) SAILING ALONG THE HISTORY  OF CULTURES 


exerts by A. Brinkley

Natives in the new world

FIRST ENCOUNTERS WITH NATIVE AMERICANS 
The
above 1505 engraving is one of the earliest European graphical
portrayals  of   Native Americans who lived for 500+
generations in the Americas before the arrival of Europeans. This is evidenced by  a skeleton of a teenage girl  named ‘Naia’  found in 2007 in the underwater caves called sistema Sac Actun in Mexico’s eastern Yucatán Peninsula – dated 13,000 years old, and it is considered the oldest genetically intact human skeleton ever found in
the Americas. 
 

This
image also represents  the ways in which Europeans would view the
people they called Indians for many generations. Native Americans here
are portrayed as exotic savages, whose sexuality was not contained
within stable families and whose savagery was evidenced in their
practice of eating the flesh of their slain enemies.

In
the background are the ships that have brought the European visitors
who recorded these images. (The Granger Collection, New York)

Naja Reveals First Americans' Roots

These
13000 + Year This is evidenced by  a skeleton of a teenage girl
 named ‘Naia’  found in 2007 in the underwater caves called
sistema Sac Actun in Mexico’s eastern Yucatán Peninsula – dated 13,000
years old, and it is considered the oldest genetically intact human
skeleton ever found in the Americas.  

Sac Antun

THE DISCOVERY OF THE AMERICAS  did
not begin with Christopher Columbus. It began 10+ thousand of years
earlier when human beings first crossed into the new continents and
began to settle. These nomadic peoples entered the new continent and
moved ever deeper into its heart and south. By the end of the fifteenth
century , when the first important contact with Europeans occurred, the
Americas were the home to more than 50 million, perhaps as many as 75 million highly evolved sapiens
 These ancient civilizations had experienced many changes and many
catastrophes during their long history. But it seems certain that none
of these experiences was as tragically transforming as the arrival of
Europeans. In the long term, European settlers came to dominate most
areas of the Americas. But even in the short term—in the first violent
years of Spanish and Portuguese exploration and conquest—the impact of
the new arrivals was profound. Battles between natives and
Europeans continued but there were also many other interactions through
which these very different civilizations shaped one another, learned
from one another, and changed each other permanently and profoundly.

Treaty of Tordesillas The 1494 Treaty of Tordesillas neatly divided the

15th Century WHY EUROPE LOOKS WESTWARD

Europeans
were almost entirely unaware of the existence of the Americas before
the fifteenth century. A few early wanderers—Leif Eriksson, an
eleventh-century Norse seaman, and perhaps others—had glimpsed parts of
the New World and had demonstrated that Europeans were capable of
crossing the ocean to reach it. But even if their discoveries had become
common knowledge (and they had not), there would have been little incentive for others to follow.
Europe in the middle ages (roughly 500– 1500 A.D.) was not an
adventurous civilization. Divided into innumerable small duchies and
kingdoms, its outlook was overwhelmingly provincial. Subsistence
agriculture predominated, and commerce was limited; few merchants looked
beyond the boundaries of their own regions. The Roman Catholic Church
exercised a measure of spiritual authority over most of the continent,
and the Holy Roman Empire provided at least a nominal political center.
Even so, real power was for the most part widely dispersed; only rarely
could a single leader launch a great venture. Gradually, however,
conditions in Europe changed so that by the late fifteenth century,
interest in overseas exploration had grown. Commerce and Nationalism
Two important and related changes provided the first incentive for
Europeans to look toward new lands. One was a result of the significant
population growth in fifteenth-century Europe. The Black Death, a
catastrophic epidemic of the bubonic plague that began in Constantinople
in 1347, had decimated Europe, killing (according to some estimates)
more than a third of the people of the continent and debilitating its
already limited economy. But a century and a half later, the population
had rebounded. With that growth came a rise in land values, a
reawakening of commerce, and a general increase in prosperity. Affluent
landlords became eager to purchase goods from distant regions, and a new
merchant class emerged to meet their demand. As trade increased, and as
advances in navigation and shipbuilding made long-distance sea travel
more feasible, interest in developing new markets, finding new products,
and opening new trade routes rapidly increased. Paralleling the rise of
commerce in Europe, and in part responsible for it, was the rise of new governments that were more united and
powerful than the feeble political entities of the feudal past. In the
western areas of Europe, the authority of the distant pope and the even
more distant Holy Roman Emperor was necessarily weak. As a result,
strong new monarchs emerged there and created centralized nation-states,
with national courts, national armies, and—perhaps most important—national tax systems.
As these ambitious kings and queens consolidated their power and
increased their wealth, they became eager to enhance the commercial
growth of their nations. Ever since the early fourteenth century, when
Marco Polo and other adventurers had returned from Asia bearing exotic goods (spices, fabrics, dyes)
and even more exotic tales, Europeans who hoped for commercial glory
had dreamed above all of trade with the East. For two centuries, that
trade had been limited by the difficulties of the long, arduous overland
journey to the Asian courts. But in the fourteenth century, as the
maritime capabilities of several western European societies increased
and as Muslim societies seized control of the eastern routes to Asia,
there began to be serious talk of finding a faster, safer sea route to
Asia. Such dreams gradually found a receptive audience in the courts of
the new monarchs. By the late fifteenth century, some of them were ready
to finance daring voyages of exploration. The first to do so were the
Portuguese. They were the preeminent maritime power in the fifteenth
century, in large part because of the work of one man, Prince Henry the
Navigator. Henry’s own principal interest was not in finding a sea route
to Asia, but in exploring the western coast of Africa. He dreamed of
establishing a Christian empire there to aid in his country’s wars
against the Moors of northern Africa; and he hoped to find new stores of
gold. 

Prince Henry the Navigator

The
explorations he began did not fulfill his own hopes, but they
ultimately led farther than he had dreamed. Some of Henry’s mariners
went as far south as Cape Verde, on Africa’s west coast. In 1486 (six
years after Henry’s death), Bartholomeu Dias rounded the southern tip of
Africa (the Cape of Good Hope); and in 1497–1498 Vasco da Gama
proceeded all the way around the cape to India. In 1500, the next fleet
bound for India, under the command of Pedro Cabral, was blown westward
off its southerly course and happened upon the coast of Brazil. 

https://panamaposse.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/4-NAO-SANTA-MARIA-AT-SUNRISE.jpeg

But
by then another man, in the service of another country, had already
encountered the New World.Christopher Columbus Christopher Columbus, who
was born and reared in Genoa, Italy, obtained most of his early
seafaring experience in the service of the Portuguese. As a young man,
he became intrigued with the possibility, already under discussion in
many seafaring circles, of reaching Asia by going not east but west.
Columbus’s hopes rested on several basic misconceptions. He believed
that the world was far smaller than it actually is. He also believed
that the Asian continent extended farther eastward than it actually
does. He assumed, therefore, that the Atlantic was narrow enough to be
crossed on a relatively brief voyage. It did not occur to him that
anything lay to the west between Europe and Asia. Columbus failed to win
support for his plan in Portugal, so he turned to Spain. The Spaniards
were not yet as advanced a maritime people as the Portuguese, but they
were at least as energetic and ambitious. And in the fifteenth century,
the marriage of Spain’s two most powerful regional rulers, Ferdinand of
Aragon and Isabella of Castile, had produced the strongest monarchy in
Europe. Like other young monarchies, it soon grew eager to demonstrate
its strength by sponsoring new commercial ventures. Columbus appealed to
Queen Isabella for support for his proposed westward voyage. In 1492,
having consolidated the monarchy’s position within Spain itself,
Isabella agreed to Columbus’s request. Commanding ninety men and three
ships—the Niña, the Pinta, and the Santa María — Columbus left Spain in
August 1492 and sailed west into the Atlantic on what he thought was a
straight course for Japan. Ten weeks later, he sighted land and assumed
he had reached his target. In fact, he had landed on an island in the
Bahamas. When he pushed on and encountered Cuba, he assumed he had
reached China. He returned to Spain in triumph, bringing with him
several captured natives as evidence of his achievement. 

This map is the earliest definitive depiction of the Americas by a European. It was drawn by Juan de la Cosa, a cartographer who accompanied Christopher Columbus on his first voyage to what would soon be known as the

(He
called the natives “Indians” because he believed they were from the
East Indies in the Pacific.) But Columbus had not, of course,
encountered the court of the great khan in China or the fabled wealth of
the Indies. A year later, therefore, he tried again, this time with a
much larger expedition. As before, he headed into the Caribbean,
discovering several other islands and leaving a small and short-lived
colony on Hispaniola. On a third voyage, in 1498, he finally reached the
mainland and cruised along the northern coast of South America. When he
passed the mouth of the Orinoco River (in present-day Venezuela), he
concluded for the first time that what he had discovered was not in fact
an island off the coast of China, as he had assumed, but a separate
continent; such a large freshwater stream, he realized, could emerge
only from a large body of land. Still, he remained convinced that Asia
was only a short distance away. And although he failed in his efforts to
sail around the northeastern coast of South America to the Indies (he
was blocked by the Isthmus of Panama), he returned to Spain believing
that he had explored at least the fringes of the Far East. He continued
to believe that until he died. Columbus’s celebrated accomplishments
made him a popular hero for a time, but he ended his life in obscurity.
When Europeans at last gave a name to the New World, they ignored him.
The distinction went instead to a Florentine merchant, Amerigo Vespucci,
a member of a later Portuguese expedition to the New World who wrote a
series of vivid descriptions of the lands he visited and who recognized
the Americas as new continents. Columbus has been celebrated for
centuries as the “Admiral of the Ocean Sea” (a title he struggled to
have officially bestowed on him during his lifetime) and as a
representative of the new, secular, scientific impulses of Renaissance
Europe. But Columbus was also a deeply religious man, even something of a
mystic  His voyages were inspired as much by his conviction that
he was fulfilling a divine mission as by his interest in geography and
trade. A strong believer in biblical prophecies, he came to see himself
as a man destined to advance the coming of the millennium. “God made me
the messenger of the new heaven and the new earth,” he wrote near the
end of his life, “and he showed me the spot where to find it.” 

Americas

A similar combination of worldly and religious passions lay behind many
subsequent efforts at exploration and settlement of the New World.
Partly as a result of Columbus’s initiative, Spain began to devote
greater resources and energy to maritime exploration and gradually
replaced Portugal as the leading seafaring nation. The Spaniard Vasco de
Balboa fought his way across the Isthmus of Panama in 1513 and became
the first known European to gaze westward upon the great ocean that
separated America from China and the Indies. Seeking access to that
ocean, Ferdinand Magellan, a Portuguese in the employ of the Spanish,
found the strait that now bears his name at the southern end of South
America, struggled through the stormy narrows and into the ocean (so
calm by contrast that he christened it the “Pacific”), then proceeded to
the Philippines. There Magellan died in a conflict with the natives,
but his expedition went on to complete the fi rst known circumnavigation
of the globe (1519–1522). By 1550, Spaniards had explored the coasts of
North America as far north as Oregon in the west and Labrador in the
east, as well as some of the interior regions of the continent. 

The Conquistadores

In time, Spanish explorers in the New World stopped thinking of America
simply as an obstacle to their search for a route to the East. They
began instead to consider it as possible source of wealth rivaling and
even surpassing the original Indies. On the basis of Columbus’s
discoveries, the Spanish claimed for themselves the whole of the New
World, except for a piece of it (today’s Brazil) that was reserved by a
papal decree for the Portuguese. By the mid-sixteenth century, the
Spanish were well on their way to establishing a substantial American
empire. The early Spanish colonists, beginning with those Columbus
brought on his second voyage, settled on the islands of the Caribbean,
where they tried to enslave the Indians and find gold. They had little
luck in either effort. But then, in 1518, Hernando Cortés led a small
military expedition of about 600 men into Mexico. Cortés had been a
Spanish government official in Cuba for fourteen years and to that point
had achieved little success. But when he heard stories of great
treasures in Mexico, he decided to go in search of them. He met strong
and resourceful resistance from the Aztecs and their powerful emperor,
Montezuma. But Cortés and his army had, unknowingly, unleashed an
assault on the Aztecs far more devastating than military attack: they
had exposed the natives to smallpox during an early and relatively
peaceful visit to Tenochtitlán. 

The Map: Tenochtitlan, 1524

A smallpox epidemic decimated the population and made it possible for the
Spanish to triumph in their second attempt at conquest. The Spanish saw
the epidemic as vindication of their efforts. When the Christians were
 exhausted from war, one follower of Cortés said at the time, “God
saw fi t to send the Indians smallpox.” Through his ruthless suppression
of the surviving natives, Cortés established a lasting reputation as
the most brutal of the Spanish conquistadores (conquerors). The news
that silver was to be found in Mexico attracted the attention of other
Spaniards. From the island colonies and from Spain itself, a wave of
conquistadores descended on the mainland in search of fortune—a movement
comparable in some ways to the nineteenth-century gold rushes elsewhere
in the world, but far more vicious. Francisco Pizarro, who conquered
Peru (1532–1538) and revealed to Europeans the wealth of the Incas,
opened the way for other advances into South America. His onetime deputy
Hernando de Soto, in a futile search for gold, silver, and jewels, led
several expeditions (1539–1541) through Florida west into the continent
and became the fi rst white man known to have crossed the Mississippi
River. Francisco Coronado traveled north from Mexico (1540–1542) into
what is now New Mexico in a similarly fruitless search for gold and
jewels; in the process, he helped open the Southwest of what is now the
United States to Spanish settlement. The story of the Spanish warriors
is one of great military daring and achievement. It is also a story of
great brutality and greed—a story that would be repeated time and again
over centuries of European conquest of the Americas. The conquistadores
subjugated and, in some areas (through a combination of warfare and
disease), almost exterminated the native populations. In this horrible
way, they made possible the creation of a vast Spanish empire in the New
World. Spanish America Lured by dreams of treasure, Spanish explorers,
conquistadores, and colonists established a vast empire for Spain in the
New World. New European diseases and Spanish military power forced the
previously powerful Aztec and Incan empires into submission. 

9) HERNÁN CORTÉS

Hernán Cortes

Hernán Cortés de Monroy y Pizarro Altamirano was a Spanish Conquistador who
led an expedition that caused the fall of the Aztec Empire and brought
large portions of what is now mainland Mexico under the rule of Spain in
the early 16th century. Cortés was part of the generation of Spanish
explorers and conquistadors who began the first phase of the Spanish
colonization of the Americas.

He executed a successful strategy of allying with some indigenous people
against others. He also used a native woman, Doña Marina aka La
Malinche, as an interpreter who played a critically important role in
the Spanish conquest of Mexico. In addition to translating she provided
Cortez with insight into the Aztec culture, and he came to depend on her
advice on many matters. She later bore his first son.  After he
overthrew the Aztec Empire, Cortés was awarded the title of Marqués del
Valle de Oaxaca.

Encomienda

The history of the Spanish Empire spanned three distinct periods. The first was the age of discovery
and exploration—beginning with Columbus and continuing through the
first two decades of the sixteenth century. The second was the age of the conquistadores,
in which Spanish military forces (aided by the diseases they unleashed)
established their dominion over the lands once ruled by natives. The third phase
began in the 1570s, when new Spanish laws—the Ordinances of
Discovery—banned the most brutal military conquests. From that point on,
the Spanish expanded their presence in America through colonization.
The first Spaniards to arrive in the New World, the conquistadores, had
been interested in only one thing: getting rich. And in that they were
fabulously successful. For 300 years, beginning in the sixteenth
century, the mines in Spanish America yielded more than ten times as
much gold and silver as the rest of the world’s mines put together.
These riches made Spain the wealthiest and most powerful nation on
earth. After the first wave of conquest, however, most Spanish settlers
in America traveled to the New World for other reasons. Many went in
hopes of creating a profitable agricultural economy. Unlike the
conquistadores, who left little but destruction behind them, these
settlers helped establish elements of European civilization in America
that permanently altered both the landscape and the social structure.
Another important force for colonization was the Catholic Church.
Ferdinand and Isabella, in establishing Spain’s claim to most of the
Americas from Mexico south, bowed to the wishes of the Church and
established the requirement that Catholicism be the only religion of the
new territories. Spain abided by that condition. As a result, many
Spanish settlements in the New World were highly religious in character.
Although the Spanish founded commercial and military centers in the
sixteenth century, another common form of settlement by the early
seventeenth century was the mission. Missions had commercial lives, to
be sure. But their primary purpose, at least at fi rst, was converting
natives to Catholicism. There were usually military garrisons connected
to the missions, to protect them from hostile natives. Presidios
(military bases) often grew up nearby to provide additional protection.
Indeed, after the era of the conquistadores came to a close in the
1540s, the missionary impulse became one of the principal motives for
European emigration to America. Priests or friars accompanied almost all
colonizing ventures. Through the work of zealous missionaries, the
gospel of the Catholic Church ultimately extended throughout South and
Central America, Mexico, and into the South and Southwest of the present
United States.

 

Hernán - Tráiler | Amazon Prime Video

 

One of the more recent portrayals about Hernán Cortes,  la Malinche and Montezuma is now available on Amazon Prime  – give it a whirl .
The
first season consists of 8 episodes and a second season has been
confirmed as part of the 500th anniversary of the Fall of Tenochtitlan
 and revolves around Hernán Cortés from his arrival at the Mexican
coast until the defeat of the Mexicas. It’s called Hernán. 

Hernán

 

 

10) PANAMA POSSE  BURGEES 

 

 TO get your burgee please email us your US Mailing address or pick them up @
 

  • Barra De Navidad Kick off Week 
  • Shelter Bay Marina Panama 
  • Carinthia Suzanne & Dietmar will carry a few extra Burgees
The Panama Pose Burgees

PATHFINDER 

Orion

ORION 

Maison de Sante

IKAGI & MAISON DE SANTE

 

 

 

11) PICTURES OF THE WEEK 

Picture of the Week by due west

DUE WEST Captain Kirk 

picture of the week by shearwater

PICTURE OF THE WEEK BY Shearwater

 

 

 

Pati & Eric

 

 

 

pineapple
 
COUNTRIES

 

12) Flor de Caña  SAN DIEGO PARTY  RECAP

Great times getting to know the fleet for pictures visit 
https://panamaposse.com/california-yacht-marina-party >>

 

 

 

 

13) PANAMA POSSE SEASON AWARDS CATEGORIES  

Pictures

HERE ARE THE CATEGORIES 

  • BIGGEST FISH CAUGHT ✔ 
  • PICTURE OF THE YEAR ✔  
  • PANAMA POSSE YODA OF THE YEAR ✔  
  • SPEEDY AWARD – SEVENSTAR AWARD ✔  
  • THE CAPTAIN RON AWARD ✔ 
  • MOST UNWELCOME VISITOR ONBOARD ✔ 
  • HIGHEST WIND RECORDED ✔ 
  • SPIRIT OF EXPLORATION ✔ 
  • GALLEY GOD(ESS) ✔ 
  • GOOD SAMARITAN OF THE YEAR ✔  

 

 

 

14) NEW ENTRIES INTO BIGGEST FISH CAUGHT CATEGORY

CHANGE UP

CHANGE UP

CHANGE UP

CHANGE UP

NO MORE GAMES

NO MORE GAMES

 

 

15) PANAMA POSSE KICKOFF & SEMINAR WEEK MEXICO

BARRA

🇲🇽  Here are our dates and revised Seminar Schedule
December 2021 in Barra de Navidad, Mexico 

Thursday December 2nd, 2021

    

    @ 10:00 PANAMA POSSE INTRO AND OVERVIEW   and Fleet Tracking

 

    @ 13:00 ROUTE PLANNING & NAVIGATION    

 

Friday December 3rd, 2021

 

    @ 10:00 WILDERNESS SURVIVAL, MEDICAL AND SELF RESCUE

 

    @ 13:00 COMMUNICATIONS, WEATHER, SAFETY

 

    @ 17:30 PANAMA POSSE KICK OFF PARTY

 

Saturday December 4th, 2021

 

    @ 10:00 PANAMA POSSE SWAP MEET

 

    @ 13:00 SATELLITE CHARTS / OPEN CPN / GOOD NAUTICAL   

 

    @ 17:30 PANAMA POSSE OVER THE TOP POT LUCK RED CUP DOCK PARTY 
 

       -> details here on how to win the chef award and 
POT LUCK EXPECTATIONS->

 

 

BBQ

 

Sunday December 5th, 2021

 

    @ 09:00 Coral Reef Measuring – Adventure Scientists and University Guadalajara & Panama Posse collaboration Details >>

 

    @ 13:00 PROVISIONING, WHAT TO SEE AND DO, RECAP, Q&A

 

Monday December 6th, 2021  RALLY & MISSION START

 

      @ NEW TIME 08:00 CORAL REEF MEASURING SESSION START 

 

     Adventure Scientists and University Guadalajara & Panama Posse collaboration Details>> 

MUST SEE

16) ADVENTURE SCIENTISTS AND UNIVERSITY OF GUADALAJARA TO CONDUCT MEXICAN CORAL REEF STUDIES WITH PANAMA POSSE VOLUNTEERS

Adventure Scientists

Mexico’s Pacific Coast is home to some of the world’s most biodiverse coral

reefs, underwater communities that support sharks, turtles, and other

marine life. They also support human lives by buffering the coastline

from intense storms and providing livelihoods from fishing and tourism.

Yet these reefs are imperiled by ocean acidification, more frequent and

powerful storms due to climate change, and damage from human overuse.

 

Mexico’s Pacific Coast is home to some of the world’s most biodiverse coral reefs, underwater communities that support sharks, turtles, and other marine life. They also support human lives by buffering the coastline from intense storms and providing livelihoods from fishing and tourism. Yet these reefs are imperiled by ocean acidification, more frequent and powerful storms due to climate change, and damage from human overuse.

 

https://www.adventurescientists.org/mexico-reefs-panama-posse.html

 

Teams of Panama Posse volunteer divers will survey up to 40 coral reef sites

multiple times a year for several years. Mexico’s Pacific Coast is

harbor to some of the world’s most bio-diverse coral reefs which are

imperiled by ocean acidification, more frequent and powerful storms

 and damage from tourism. Season 5 Mexican Coral Reefs Project

Requirements

WHEN & WHERE 

Sunday December 5th, 2021

 

    @ 09:00 Coral Reef Measuring – Adventure Scientists and University Guadalajara & Panama Posse collaboration Details >>

 

Monday December 6th, 2021  RALLY & MISSION START

 

      @ NEW TIME 08:00 CORAL REEF MEASURING SESSION START 

 

     Adventure Scientists and University Guadalajara & Panama Posse collaboration Details>> 

To Particpate:

☑ Be at the Panama Posse  Kickoff week in  Barra de Navidad, Mexico December 2 – 6, 2021  

☑ Certified diver that can safely and competently collect data underwater

☑ Access to a boat to travel to established reef monitoring locations

☑ Attend an in-person training in Barra de Navidad with Dr. Paola 

Rodriguez

 

 

TO PARTICIPATE AND SIGN UP FOR THIS PROGRAM PLEASE SIGN UP NOW >>

 

VOLUNTEER TRAINING:

 

 On
December 6, Dr. Rodriguez will hold an in-person training for Panama
Posse members who have completed the online training. Before attending,
you need to submit the online application linked below to understand
project requirements and to gain access to the online training.  

 

 

DIVE SURVEYS:

 

Field sites are predetermined (GPS coordinates provided) and no deeper than  
12 meters / 40 feet.  

 

 

https://www.adventurescientists.org/mcr-application-pp.html

 

Reef

 

 

 

17) PANAMA POSSE LINE CALLS

 

PANAMA POSSE LINE CALLS ARE HELD ON 
MONDAYS@ 15:30 UTC  for the Atlantic and Caribbean followed by 16:00 for the Pacific

 

IF YOU ARE SIGNED UP FOR THE 21·22 SEASON 
please join the new PANAMA POSSE LINE GROUP *
if you have not seen or deleted the invite please email 
us with your LINE USER INFORMATION  including cell number
( * it’s seasonal and for participants only get line from https://line.me)

 

 

LINE

 

 

 

18) FLEET TRACKING COURTESY OF PREDICT WIND  

 

Tracking

 

SIGN UP FOR FLEET TRACKING ( takes up to a week to get added ) >>

 

For Help and to review the different options 

TECHNICAL SUPPORT ABOUT THE FLEET TRACKING PROCESS >>

 

About Tracking:

Designed
to give interesting parties  an overview. For specific vessel
details including their floatplan, latest updates, changes, positions
and specific location related questions please contact each vessel
directly.  

 

 

 

19) PANAMA POSSE FACEBOOK GROUP 21-22

fb
 
Delta Swizzler

 

 

 

20) FREE ACCESS TO GOOD NAUTICAL  

IF YOU ARE SIGNED UP FOR THE 21·22 PANAMA POSSE SEASON you are already assigned with your access credentials to the expanded GOODNAUTICAL regions 

We expect to launch a mobile offline (paid) version later this season.
Good progress being made
 
 

 

Good Nautical

 

 

 

21) DOCUMENTS YOU WILL NEED THIS FALL

 

Valid Passports 
– with at least 360 days left on the expiration date 

Vessel Documentation 

matching the passports or if your vessel is registered as a corporation
a certified letter of ownership / authorization to operate the
vessel 

 

NOTE:
PANAMA JUST ANNOUNCED THAT YOU WILL NEED USCG DOCS not STATE VESSEL REGISTRATION PAPERS TO ENTER

Vessel Operator Certificate of Competence 

to operate the vessel – this is a formality but some countries
authorities want to make sure that you have what it takes –  you
can get them from most states
including this free one – testing is done online, or your ASA, US Sailing, RYA or equivalent

Third Party Liability Insurance for Marinas  
– if you plan to stay at marinas you will need 3rd party liability insurance 

Prescriptions
– if you have prescription drugs on board please be sure to have your valid prescriptions to match from your doctor

Pet Vaccination Records

all the docs you can muster plus more – vaccination certificates – 15
digit international chips under their skin – rabies vaccination
certificate  . etc etc.

and most controversial of all … 

PROOF OF COVID VACCINATION  

this may not be mandatory (yet) but it will make your journey a whole
lot easier and reduce quarantine costs, reduce testing requirements, and
reduce frictions at borders (on both entry and exit ) 

 

22) GET YOUR SATELLITE CHARTS 

 With 112 GIG’s of charts for participants thanks to Rob Murray to download them visit https://panamaposse.com/charts
 

  • THESE LATEST CHARTS ARE NOW ONLINE INCLUDING  DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 7.4 GB  

 

 

open cpn

 

 

 

 

23) PANAMA POSSE MARINAS SPONSORS  

🇺🇸 California Yacht Marina, San Diego, Chula Vista, USA  

🇲🇽 Marina Coral, Ensenada – Mexico  

🇲🇽 IGY Marina Cabo San Lucas  – Mexico  

🇲🇽 Marina de la Paz – Mexico

🇲🇽 Marina Puerto Escondido – Mexico

🇲🇽 Marina y Club de Yates Isla Cortes – Mexico

🇲🇽 Marina el Cid – Mazatlan – Mexico

🇲🇽 Marina Vallarta, Puerto Vallarta – Mexico Marina

🇲🇽 PANAMA POSSE HQ  – Marina Puerto de La Navidad  

🇲🇽 Marina Ixtapa, Ixtapa – Mexico Marina

🇲🇽 La Marina Acapulco, Acapulco – Mexico Marina

🇲🇽 Vicente’s Moorings, Acapulco – Mexico Mooring

🇲🇽 Marina Chiapas – Mexico Marina Chiapas

🇬🇹 Marina Pez Vela – Guatemala Marina Chiapas

🇸🇻 Marina Bahia del Sol – El Salvador Marina Bahia del Sol

🇸🇻 La Palma Moorings – Bahia del Sol, El Salvador Mooring

🇳🇮 Marina Puesta del Sol – Nicaragua Marina Puesta del Sol

🇨🇷 Marina Papagayo – Costa Rica  Marina Papagayo

🇨🇷 Marina Pez Vela – Costa Rica Marina Pez Vela

🇨🇷 Marina Bahia Golfito – Costa Rica Marina Bahia Golfito 

🇨🇷 Banana Bay Marina – Costa Rica Banana Bay Marina

🇪🇨 Marina Puerto Amistad, Ecuador 01

🇵🇦 PANAMA POSSE PACIFIC HQ Vista Mar Marina – Panama  

 🇵🇦 Shelter Bay Marina – Panama  

🇵🇦 IGY Red Frog Marina – Panama

🇵🇦 Bocas Marina – Panama Bocas Marina

🇵🇦 Linton Bay Marina – Panama Linton Bay Marina

🇨🇴 ClubNautico Cartagena – Colombia 

🇨🇴 Club de Pesca Marina Cartagena – Colombia 

🇨🇴 Marina Puerto Velero – Colombia

🇨🇴 IGY Marina Santa Marta – Colombia 

🇯🇲 Royal Jamaica Yacht Club – Jamaica 

🇯🇲 Errol Flynn Marina – Jamaica 

🇯🇲 Montego Bay Yacht Club –Jamaica 

🇰🇾 The Barcadere Marina –Cayman Islands 

🇭🇳 Barefoot Cay Marina – Roatan – Honduras 

🇭🇳 Fantasy Island Marina – Roatan – Honduras

🇭🇳 Jonesville Point Marina -Roatan – Honduras 

🇬🇹 Marina Nana Juana Resort & Boatyard – Guatemala 

🇧🇿 Thunderbirds Marine – Placencia – Belize 

🇲🇽 Marina Makax – Isla Mujeres – Mexico

🇲🇽 Marina V&V – Quintana Roo – Mexico 

🇲🇽 Marina El Cid – Cancún – Riviera Maya – Mexico  

🇨🇺 Marina Marlin Nautica Cayo Largo – Cuba 

🇹🇨 South Bank Marina & Boatyard – Turks and Caicos 

🇩🇴 Marina Puerto Bahia – Dominican Republic 

🇧🇸 Romora Bay Resort and Marina – Bahamas 

🇧🇸 Elizabeth on the Bay Marina – Bahamas  

🇧🇸 Blue Marlin Cove Resort & Marina – Bahamas  

🇺🇸 Marathon Marina – Marathon Keys, FL, USA 

🇺🇸 Pier 66  Hotel & Marina – Ft. Lauderdale, FL 

🇺🇸 IGY Marina at Ortega Landing – Jacksonville, FL 

🇺🇸 Morningstar Marinas Golden Isles St. Simons Isl.,  GA

🇺🇸 Windmill Harbour Marina – Hilton Head, SC

🇺🇸 Coffee Bluff Marina – Savannah, GA 

🇺🇸 Hazzard Marine – Gerogetown, NC 

🇺🇸 Holden Beach  – Town Dock, NC

🇺🇸 Portside Marina – Morehead City, NC

🇺🇸 Tide Water Marina –  Portsmouth, VA 

🇺🇸  Ocean Yacht Marina–   Portsmouth, VA  

🇺🇸 York River Yacht Haven – Gloucester Point, VA 

🇺🇸 Yorktown Riverwalk Landing –Yorktown, VA

 

 

Ramora

 

 

24) PANAMA POSSE  SPONSORS 

 

  • SHELTER ISLAND INFLATABLES 
  • PREDICT WIND
  • SEVENSTAR YACHT TRANSPORT
  • HOME DEPOT PRO MEXICO
  • HERTZ RENTAL CARS  MEXICO
  • YACHT AGENTS GALAPAGOS 
  • FLOR DE CAÑA
  • CALIFORNIA YACHT MARINA 
SLOOTH

25) SHELTER ISLAND INFLATABLES, SAN DIEGO

We are happy to announce that also this year we will be partnering with SHELTER ISLAND INFLATABLES SAN DIEGO

 

Premier Luxury Tender & Outboard Motor Dealership

 

Shelter
Island Inflatables is a full service dealership featuring authorized
parts, sales, and service for Mercury, Suzuki Marine, Novurania, Inmar
Inflatable Boats, Williams Jet Tenders, & Highfield.

Shelter Island Inflatables has moved its location to 2727 Shelter Island Dr. “Under the Brigantine restaurant”

Showroom: 619-222-1200          Service Yard: 619-269-5702

 

We
are a full-service dealership for authorized parts, sales, and service
for inflatable dinghies and tenders. We have an expert sales and service
team specializing in outboard motors.

https://shelterislandinflatables.com/

CONTACT 

David@shelterislandinflatables.com

2727 Shelter Island Dr, San Diego, CA 92106

 

 

26) PANAMA CANAL AGENT CENTENARIO CONSULTING ERICK GALVEZ

 

To
arrange for transit with the Panama Canal Authority please contact Eric
Galvez our dedicated Panama Canal agent and sponsor of the Panama Posse
and the Pacific Posse

Erick Gálvez

Erick Gálvez

info@centenarioconsulting.com

www.centenarioconsulting.com

Cellphone +507 6676-1376

WhatsApp +507 6676-1376

Erick

 

 

 

27) STRATEGIC PARTNERS 

SEVEN SEAS CRUISING ASSOCIATION

Vicente’s Moorings – Acapulco – Mexico

ONESAILS MEXICO – Puerto Vallarta – Mexico

Park Avenue Villas – San Juan del Sur – Nicaragua

Coconutz – Playa Cocos – Costa Rica

Abernathy – Chandlery – Panama

Pacific Posse 

Advertising Partners – Las Vegas

Safe-Esteem.com – Delaware

 


SIGN UP FOR THE 21-22 PANAMA POSSE  
 

 

 

WE OPERATE UNDER INTERNATIONAL MARITIME LAW

 

YOUR VESSEL YOUR CREW YOUR RESPONSIBILITY 











Panama Posse we sail where the Coconute Grow

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Jungle

panama posse communications 
 @ 9811 w charleston blvd 2262 89117 Las Vegas USA