Oaxaca City in the Centro District in the Central Valleys region of the state. Heritage and cultural tourism makes up an important part of the city’s economy, and it has numerous colonial-era structures as well as significant archeological sites and elements of the continuing native Zapotec and Mixtec cultures.

It is the site of the month-long cultural festival called the “Guelaguetza”, which features Oaxacan dance from the seven regions, music, and a beauty pageant for indigenous women. 


 

The city is also known as “la Verde Antequera” and the variety of structures built from a native green stone. The name Oaxaca is derived from the Nahuatl name for the place, Huaxyacac, which was Hispanicized to Guajaca, later spelled Oaxaca. In 1872, “de Juárez” was added in honor of Benito Juárez, a native of this state who became president, serving from 1852 to 1872.

Zocalo

The Plaza de la Constitución, or Zócalo, was planned out in 1529 by Juan Peláez de Berrio. During the entire colonial period this plaza was never paved, nor had sidewalks, only a marble fountain that was placed here in 1739. This was removed in 1857 to put in the bandstand and trees were planted. In 1881, the vegetation here was rearranged and in 1885, a statue of Benito Juárez was added. It was remodeled again in 1901 and a new Art Nouveau bandstand installed. Fountains of green stone with capricious figures were installed in 1967. The bandstand in the center hosts the State Musical Band, La Marimba and other groups

Museum

Museo De Arte Contemporaneo De Oaxaca
is housed in the so-called Casa de Cortés. It is one of the oldest buildings in the city and one of the most representative of non-religious buildings.   Although it has been modified somewhat over the years, it still conserves its basic layout with rooms surrounding three courtyards. The architectural style is basically Andalucian modified by Oaxaca traditions.  The main portal is Spanish Baroque and has three levels. In the first, there are two “tritóstila” columns that support the balcony which has wrought iron railings.  At the top of the window is seal of the Jesuits. The third level contains a central niche with a sculpture of an archangel as well as the coats of arms of the Laso de la Vega and the Pinelo families.  

Museum

The architectural style is basically Andalucian modified by Oaxaca traditions.  The main portal is Spanish Baroque and has three levels. In the first, there are two “tritóstila” columns that support the balcony which has wrought iron railings.  At the top of the window is seal of the Jesuits. The third level contains a central niche with a sculpture of an archangel as well as the coats of arms of the Laso de la Vega and the Pinelo families.  

Mercado Benito Juárez is located one block south of the Zócalo on Flores Magón and Las Casas but it takes up the entire city block 

MercadoBenitoJuárez

OAXACA City Map & Regional Map
Oaxaca

Narrow streets are paved with stones extracted from the nearby mountains

One of the local culinary hot spots RESTAURANT  “LAS QUINCE LETRAS

Serene setting in the inner courtyard

Delectable and  affordable dishes

And the Favorite “Bichos al Plato III”

SEVEN STYLES OF MOLE

Mole from Nahuatl mōlli, “sauce” is a traditional marinade and sauce originally used in Mexican cuisine. |
In contemporary Mexico the term is used for a number of sauces – see below

 

1. MOLE NEGRO

The “typical” savory-sweet mole mentioned above, and the one most frequently found.onion, garlic, whole spices like cinnamon, cloves, black pepper and cumin, dried chiles, pumpkin and sesame seeds, herbs like hoja santo (which contributes to the dark color) and cilantro, bread for thickening and sometimes dried fruit for extra sweetness.

 

 

2. MOLE ROJO

Red mole, also known as mole poblano,  using many of the same spices and base ingredients and also contains chocolate, but less. Instead, this sweeter, spicier and  versatile version is amped up with several kinds of dried red chile like pasilla, guajillo and ancho as well as pulverized raisins and almonds or peanuts. When the sauce is done, browned chicken, pork or beef is typically added and stewed until tender .

 

3. MOLE COLORADITO  

This brew translates to “a shade of red,” or “on the nifty side,” depending on what you’re doing in the kitchen. Somewhere between rojo and negro in color, this brown mole shares the base ingredients of whole spices, onions, garlic, seeds and chocolate and features  secret ingredients for thickening and sweetening: mashed ripe plantain.

 

4. MOLE AMARILLO

Picture all the goodness of the first three moles without the sweet and chocolate stuff and you have a delicious basic sauce to pour over or use as a cooking base   It’s not unlike a simple Indian curry sauce, the sky’s the limit.

MOLE AMARILLO

 

 

5. MOLE VERDE

White on the outside, green on the inside — that’s a pumpkin seed. Extra pepitas or pipian, along with fresh tomatillos, jalapenos and cilantro are the key ingredients in bright green mole verde. It can be diluted with chicken stock when it’s finished and poured over cooked chicken to make a soupy sauce mopped up with tortillas or bread.

Mole Verde

 

 

6. MOLE CHICHILO 

This one’s a little more intense. Round up all the beef bones y as you’re going to need them. This dark, spicy sauce starts with rich, homemade beef stock. The stock rehydrates dried chiles de arbol, anchos and guajillos which you then blend with the usual slow-cooked garlic and onions. Mole chichilo is thickened with either masa harina, lime-cured corn flour, or crushed fresh tortillas. No chocolate here but excellent for braises.Mole CHICHILO

 

 

7. MOLE MANCHAMANTEL 

This  mole is between the bright red chorizo grease, tomatoes and ancho chiles, you do not want to get this stuff on anything white. Featuring fresh pineapple in addition to plantain, manchamantel is a sweet, spicy, fruity sauce . Hence the name – translated into “tablecloth-staining”

MOLE MANCHAMANTEL

 

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